The Revolution is Switzerland: Universal will be low income

Is there a minimum living wage in all countries? No. Germany has so far had no statutory minimum wage, while Chancellor Angela Merkel (Christian Democratic center-right), and the Social Democratic Party (center-left) have recently agreed to introduce gradually, starting in 2015, minimum payment 8.5 euros per hour in any profession. Other countries with no minimum wage in Europe are Switzerland, Norway, Denmark, Finland, Sweden, Austria, Iceland, Italy and Cyprus. Well, Switzerland is working on the issue.
30/12/2013 | 9:27 comentáprintmailA + A-
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If approved the popular initiative, the project will cost the state budget about 200,000 million Swiss francs per year (U.S. $ 224 million), nearly a third of GDP, calculated as the newspaper Neue Zürcher Zeitung.
On the necessity and appropriateness of the existence of a statutory minimum wage no unianimidad. Critics say limited job creation, and its proponents claim that maintains basic standards of dignity.
 
The statistics are not conclusive, in part because they refer to countries with very different economic and social situations.
 
There are countries with a very high minimum wage have very low levels of unemployment, and there is no minimum wage in countries where unemployment is reduced. Critics say limited job creation, and its proponents claim that maintains basic standards of dignity.
 
In general, those who attribute positive effects to the minimum wage point out that a reduction of underpaid labor, and, therefore, labor exploitation. Also argue that reducing dependence on state aid for low-wage earners, which may result in lower taxes for the whole population, and also allows for increased productivity, by promoting, in theory, capital investment and training, discouraging the use of a large amount of labor.
 
To his detractors, however, the statutory minimum wage may mean higher unemployment, especially for those receiving low wages, and labor costs involved eventually make it necessary to reduce the number of workers.
 
In this context, Switzerland is considering introducing the law of universal basic income. Guarantee a monthly payment from the State of about $ 2,800 to any adult citizen and about $ 700 for each child.
 
It will be an amount that the country’s government paid unconditionally to any citizen, whether or not a job, regardless of their overall economic situation.
 
The 04/10, proponents of the initiative turned in more than 126,000 signatures in favor of organizing a national referendum on the issue to the Federal Chancellery of the country. Since 1981, the Swiss have the right to request a referendum on any issue if they can collect 100,000 signatures. The results have legislative effect. Now, authorities have 5.5 years for organizing the national vote, but activists predict that the referendum could take place as early as 2014.
 
If approved the popular initiative, the project will cost the state budget about 200,000 million Swiss francs per year (U.S. $ 224 million), nearly a third of GDP, calculated as the newspaper Neue Zürcher Zeitung.
 
However, project developers claim that this amount is not a problem for the country, which spends about 70,000 million francs per year (U.S. $ 78,000 million) in social benefits. They argue that the introduction of universal basic income (RB), the bureaucratic system that is necessary today to decide who to grant state aid and who does not, cease to exist, freeing additional resources.
 
Also ensure that the RB will make more attractive unpopular and poorly paid jobs. They insist that a guaranteed monthly minimum not deprive people wish to work, as most important works because it sees what you are doing and feel that society appreciates their work.
 
They emphasize that the RB will increase productivity because everyone will be devoted to the work that you really like, apart from the physical priorities: never be afraid to change jobs and experience. Also, people have more time to educate children and assist sick relatives

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