You would have to Bush Jr.: Al Qaeda occupied Fallujah and Ramadi

Difficult to understand 2 invasions from USA to Iraq. But the 2nd. was particularly inexplicable, ridiculous. George W. Bush could never explain it further, the foundations were false as was tested immediately. Impossible not to remember now that Al Qaeda was able to control portions of Fallujah and Ramadi, 2 of the most important cities of Iraq, after burning police stations, prisons release prisoners and occupy mosques, The New York Times. USA withdrew from Iraq because I could not justify the effort and finance derivative having overthrown their former ally Saddam Hussein. Government soldiers in Iraq were sent to the 2 cities, located in the province of Anbar, the Sunni resistance core. The fighting began after Prime Minister Nuri Kamal al-Maliki, a Shiite, ordered the security forces to dismantle camps in Fallujah and Ramadi controlled by Sunni radicals and members of Al-Qaida in Iraq. Ousted Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, was a member of the Sunni minority. After the U.S. invasion, power passed to the Shiite majority (Islamic current that governs Iran). The New York Times said that the outbreaks of violence in Ramadi and Fallujah have implications beyond the border of the province of Anbar, as Sunni militants fighting the government of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad in partnership with the group The Islamic State Iraq and Syria, a branch of al-Qaeda. BUENOS AIRES (Urgente24). Militants from the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, organization linked to Al Qaeda, took over half of the Iraqi cities of Fallujah and Ramadi in Al Anbar province, west of Baghdad, sources with the Ministry of Interior Iraqi . “One half of Fallujah is under control of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, the other the control armed militias, while part of the city of Ramadi has also been busy,” the Qatari television network Al Jazeera. From early morning the bloody clashes between dozens of armed militants of both cities and the “terrorists” of Al Qaeda resumed, the source added without specifying the number of victims. In addition to tribal militias, the Iraqi army and police are fighting al Qaeda militants in Khalidiya, east of Ramadi and Al Siyar, north of Fallujah. The 1st. Iraqi Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki ordered the eve send military reinforcements to the province of Al Anbar, the scene from two days of severe clashes between the army and armed groups of men do. With that decision, the Maliki backtracked on its statement issued a day before the troops withdrew from the area considering that the armed forces had “defeated in his attack on Al Qaeda nests” after the eviction of Sunni in Ramadi on Monday 30/12/2013. The violence intensified after the army launched an operation that day to remove a protest camp against the government in Ramadi. The authorities claimed that the camp housed armed extremists, but the protesters refused the allegations and claimed that only legitimately protesting against discrimination and mistreatment by the Sunni minority government. In late 2012, thousands of Sunni Iraqis began mass protests in cities across the country to demand the release of detained without charge and the cancellation of the anti-terrorism law. The protests ended made permanent camps in the capital of the Sunni-majority provinces, including Al Anbar. At the time of the late Saddam Hussein were Sunnis who dominated Iraq’s government, but after the U.S. invasion and the fall of the former regime, Shiites gained control of several key positions, including that of prime minister. Iraq is currently experiencing an escalation of sectarian violence caused by the conflict between Sunnis and Shiites, in addition to attacks that left about 8,868 in 2013, including 7,818 civilians, the highest number in five years. The balance disclosed by Mission United Nations Assistance for Iraq (UNAMI) differs from that provided by the Iraqi authorities, which are estimated at 7,154 the number of deaths and the British organization Iraq Body Count, which accounts for 9,475. The New York newspaper added that the outbreaks of violence in Ramadi and Fallujah have implications beyond the border of the province of Anbar, as Sunni militants fighting the government of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad in partnership with the group The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, a branch of al-Qaeda. Dressed in black robes and waving flags of Al-Qaeda militants took mosques used loudspeakers to ask your support in fighting in Ramadi and Fallujah. The fighting on Thursday in those cities of Anbar province and a deadly terrorist bombing in Beirut, Lebanon, indicate that the civil war in Syria is spreading sectarian violence throughout the region “destabilizing Lebanon and Iraq, while feeding the resurgence of radical Islamic fighters, “the paper said. For the U.S. Army, who retired in 2011 from Iraq, Anbar province has great historical significance. It’s where more U.S. soldiers were killed during the occupation of Iraq. The New York Times said that almost 33% of U.S. casualties in Iraq were recorded during attempts to pacify Anbar. American soldiers fought two bloody battles for control of Fallujah “in the bloodiest street battles since the Vietnam War street,” said the newspaper.

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